Button Street, New Haven

Design

d

  • Gioia Connell
  • Clara Domange
  • Will James
  • Eunice Lee
  • Zack Lenza
  • Max Ouellete-Howitz
  • Manasi Punde

Our home de­sign is gen­er­ated by three key val­ues: iden­tity, pri­vacy, and con­nec­tion. The house seeks to pro­vide a place of com­fort and se­cu­rity for its res­i­dents, while fos­ter­ing bonds with the sur­round­ing en­vi­ron­ment. A tree-like CLT struc­ture stretches through the house, cre­at­ing open­ings that con­nect to its sur­round­ings. The struc­ture de­fines the front and back porches, the liv­ing spaces on both unit up­per lev­els, and a tall light-well that nat­u­rally il­lu­mi­nates the build­ing. Our tree acts as the pri­mary con­nec­tion to the out­side, and serves as a pow­er­ful for­mal or­ga­nizer.

e

  • Miriam Dreiblatt
  • Michael Glassman
  • Alex Pineda Jongeward
  • Limy Rocha
  • Paul Shen
  • Xiaohui Wen

Our de­sign is pred­i­cated on two sim­ple, yet fun­da­men­tal char­ac­ter­is­tics of a home — own­er­ship and pri­vacy. The two units share a front porch on Button Street and have views of the larger site on the sec­ond story. Due to the asym­me­tries in the pro­gram and site con­di­tions, we de­signed the stu­dio and fam­ily homes to wrap around each other. The ver­ti­cal align­ment of the two units on the first floor turns into a hor­i­zon­tal align­ment on the sec­ond, giv­ing both par­ties ac­cess and views of the land­scape. The in­ter­lock­ing CLT forms em­body our re­sponse to co­hab­i­ta­tion.

f

  • Rosa Congdon
  • Deo Deiparine
  • Michael Gasper
  • Megan Tan
  • Brenna Thompson
  • Kay Yang

This pro­ject hopes to cre­ate a sense of be­long­ing while fos­ter­ing the au­ton­omy of its res­i­dents. Derived from the larger con­text of the New Haven rail­road and river, the idea of the di­ag­o­nal be­comes im­ple­mented as an in­ter­nal or­ga­ni­za­tional prin­ci­ple and un­der­ly­ing grid. The rigid­ity of the façade is dis­man­tled in lay­ers from the street to back­yard, cre­at­ing dy­namic yet pri­vate spa­tial mo­ments for the res­i­dents.

i

  • Camille Chabrol
  • Serena Ching
  • Page Comeaux
  • Phoebe Harris
  • Rhea Schmid
  • Seth Thompson

Our scheme pro­poses to unite the ef­fi­ciency unit and the fam­ily unit around a shared cen­tral court­yard as a way to scale the large lot down to a more in­ti­mate size. The build­ing masses are gen­er­ated by a CLT ma­trix and con­tex­tu­al­ized by a screen en­ve­lope that aligns with two neigh­bor­hood da­tums: the porch­line and the first-story roofline.

h

  • Katharine Blackman
  • Jackson Lindsay
  • Matthew Liu
  • Jewel Pei
  • David Schaengold
  • Maya Sorabjee
  • Arghavan Taheri

Our pro­posal trans­lates the spa­tial con­di­tion within the neigh­bor­hood to the scale of the site, cre­at­ing a sys­tem of stri­a­tions that or­ga­nize the pro­gram and set up an adapt­able frame­work for fu­ture ex­pan­sion. These stri­a­tions form a home that con­nects its res­i­dents via a shared spine, while giv­ing each house­hold the means to grow into their homes.

a

  • Michelle Badr
  • Helen Farley
  • Tianyu Guan
  • Andrew Kim
  • Andrew Miller
  • Jonathan Palomo
  • Laelia Vaulot

Given the dou­ble lot at 43 Button street, we pro­pose to site this house across the street­side edge of the prop­erty. The house ex­tends to fill the width of the site, dif­fer­ing from the typ­i­cal ori­en­ta­tion of homes on the block but echo­ing the con­tin­u­ous, tex­tured streetscape of porches and en­tries. This as­serts the res­i­dents’ pres­ence in the Button Street com­mu­nity with a gen­er­ous front porch that par­tic­i­pates in the neigh­borly cul­ture of a New Haven block. Once be­yond the thresh­old of the porch, each unit opens ex­pan­sively onto the en­closed back­yard gar­den.

b

  • Cristina Anastase
  • Adam Feldman
  • Kelley Johnson
  • Layla Ni
  • Deirdre Plaus
  • Jenna Ritz
  • Armaan Shah

Sited on a spa­cious lot on Button Street, this de­sign in­ves­ti­gates the close ad­ja­cen­cies and re­la­tion­ships be­tween two dis­tinct units within a sin­gle build­ing en­ve­lope. Capped with a dou­ble gable roof and fronted with a shared porch — el­e­ments that are pulled from the ar­chi­tec­tural lan­guage of the street — the fa­cade pre­sents two home iden­ti­ties.

A sculp­tural CLT light well guides this steal­ing of space. Designed to di­rect light into the liv­ing space of the in­di­vid­ual unit, it reaches into the fam­i­ly’s liv­ing space, al­low­ing the lat­ter to wrap around it and ex­tend above the sin­gle unit. The CLT acts as both a fig­ural and lit­eral core, spa­tially en­wrap­ping each user within. As the core pro­jects up­ward, it un­folds to cre­ate a rhyth­mic dou­ble gable for quin­tes­sen­tial shel­ter.

c

  • Ruchi Dattani
  • Nathan Garcia
  • Katie Lau
  • Alix Pauchet
  • Kelsey Rico
  • Rukshan Vathupola
  • Darryl Weimer

Our pro­ject spa­tially and ma­te­ri­ally col­lages the hous­ing masses of the two units around a shared out­door space. This pos­i­tive void of the shared out­door space both di­vides and con­nects the units, ne­go­ti­at­ing pri­vate and col­lec­tive spaces. Through this out­door space, we are of­fer­ing our clients, who will be shar­ing this ex­pe­ri­ence of tran­si­tion­ing into hous­ing, space where they can in­ter­act as neigh­bors. The out­door space is in­tended to fa­cil­i­tate gath­er­ing around meals and to cul­ti­vate so­cial re­la­tion­ships em­bed­ded in prepar­ing and en­joy­ing food with oth­ers. Additionally, it main­tains a sense of pri­vacy for our clients through the sep­a­ra­tion of the units on the ground floor. The CLT that struc­turally sup­ports the bed­rooms on the sec­ond floor, frames and de­fines the out­door space and tec­ton­i­cally and ex­pe­ri­en­tially me­di­ates con­nec­tions from each units’ in­di­vid­ual kitchen to the shared space.

g

  • Emily Cass
  • Rachel LeFevre
  • Thomas Mahon
  • Christine Pan
  • Lisette Valenzuela
  • Paul Wu

Our pro­posal ex­plores the par­al­lel be­tween join­ery and co­hab­i­ta­tion, propos­ing a dwelling that unites sep­a­rate units within a sin­gle en­ve­lope, while still al­low­ing each fam­ily to main­tain au­ton­omy. Cross-laminated tim­ber forms the in­ter­nal sep­a­ra­tion, ex­tend­ing into the land­scape to in­te­grate the house with its sur­round­ings.